Thursday, July 3, 2014

Increased Risk Of Stroke for Thyroid and Diabetes Patients!

Increased Risk Of Stroke for Thyroid and Diabetes Patients!

Attention: If you or someone you know is stricken with diabetes along with low thyroid, known as hypothyroidism, then you MUST read this article.  Your life may already be hanging on by a thread, a thread that your doctor doesn’t even know may be unraveling quickly.
Research has shown that diabetic patients are commonly found to have concurrent thyroid disorders.
In comparison to the normal population, diabetics have over 30% more hypothyroid disease, an 11% increase in postpartum diabetes and studies have shown that diabetics have over 5 times the incidence of sub-clinical hypothyroid disease compared with the normal population!
An autoimmune disease known as Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis accounts for between 70%-80% of all hypothyroid disease cases in American adults.  It is the most common cause of hypothyroid in the adult population. In people with hypothyroidism caused by autoimmune disease it has been found that they have, as a group, multiple other conditions along with the hypothyroidism.
It is known that patients with one organ-specific autoimmune disease are at risk of developing other autoimmune disorders, and because thyroid disorders are more common in females, it is not surprising that so many female diabetes patients have thyroid disease.
One problem that arises with having these two conditions together is that, due to the diabetic state of glucose dysregulation, glucose is inefficiently transported to the cells and the metabolism of glucose is diminished. This results in an increase of glucose in the blood stream.
As a result, the body will convert the excess sugar to triglycerides to be stored in adipose tissue for use as energy when it may be needed.
Because hypothyroidism decreases the overall rate at which you burn calories (Think of the thyroid as your body's furnace) and low thyroid also slows down hormone production, your triglycerides are more likely to remain in your fat cells because of the lowered energy needs of the body, this is one reason many people with low thyroid have cold hands and / or feet because the byproduct of energy production is heat, so if the bodies “furnace”, is functioning below what is required, one symptom could be those cold hands and feet.
Hypothyroidism may also increase your LDL levels (low density lipoproteins, which are wrongly called our “bad” cholesterol) by increasing the absorption of cholesterol through your liver, preventing it from effectively eliminating excess cholesterol.
So you see, diabetes causes you to make more...Read The Rest HERE
In Health,
Dr. Walter K. Crooks DM (P), DC, CCCN

Post a Comment